Use of a new Urethral Catheterisation Device (UCD) to reduce the risks of urethral trauma due to urethral catheterisation
Author(s):
Mr Simon Bugeja
,
Mr Simon Bugeja
Affiliations:
Mr Ivan HW Yim
,
Mr Ivan HW Yim
Affiliations:
Mr A Tamimi
,
Mr A Tamimi
Affiliations:
Mr Neil Roberts
,
Mr Neil Roberts
Affiliations:
Prof Anthony R Mundy
Prof Anthony R Mundy
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Frost A. 06/28/17; 177449; P10-1
Dr. Anastasia Frost
Dr. Anastasia Frost
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Abstract
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Introduction

Urethrotech™ has developed a 'ready-to-use' medical device (integrated hydrophilic nitinol guide wire into 16F Silicone 3-way Foley catheter) for difficult urethral catheterisation particularly in clinical environments where no specialist equipment or expertise is available, avoiding more dangerous alternatives such as suprapubic catheter (SPC) insertion.

This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of this new UCD™ in men undergoing cardiac-surgery.

Materials and Methods

150 consecutive men undergoing urethral catheterisation prior to cardiac-surgery were evaluated retrospectively and 74 prospectively to determine the incidence of urethral trauma due to urethral catheterisation and the need for SPC insertion. 100 patients were then studied prospectively to trial the new UCD™ to see whether it reduced the incidence of difficult urethral catheterisation.


Results

4 of 150 (2.7%) patients required a SPC for traumatic/unsuccessful catheterisation with a standard urethral catheter. No other adverse events were recorded.

7 of 74 (9.5%) patients studied prospectively after counselling and consenting had an adverse event: 5 (6.8%) had urethral/perineal pain and urethral bleeding and 2 (2.7%) required SPC.

None of the 100 patients undergoing urethral catheterisation using the Urethrotech UCD™ reported any complications.

Conclusions

Urethral catheterisation has a significant risk of trauma, particularly in elderly men with larger prostates. The Urethrotech UCD™ reduces the risk of difficult urethral catheterisation, particularly in high-risk patients, such as fully heparinised cardiac-surgery patients, and should be available when catheterisation is being performed by junior medical or nursing staff.
Introduction

Urethrotech™ has developed a 'ready-to-use' medical device (integrated hydrophilic nitinol guide wire into 16F Silicone 3-way Foley catheter) for difficult urethral catheterisation particularly in clinical environments where no specialist equipment or expertise is available, avoiding more dangerous alternatives such as suprapubic catheter (SPC) insertion.

This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of this new UCD™ in men undergoing cardiac-surgery.

Materials and Methods

150 consecutive men undergoing urethral catheterisation prior to cardiac-surgery were evaluated retrospectively and 74 prospectively to determine the incidence of urethral trauma due to urethral catheterisation and the need for SPC insertion. 100 patients were then studied prospectively to trial the new UCD™ to see whether it reduced the incidence of difficult urethral catheterisation.


Results

4 of 150 (2.7%) patients required a SPC for traumatic/unsuccessful catheterisation with a standard urethral catheter. No other adverse events were recorded.

7 of 74 (9.5%) patients studied prospectively after counselling and consenting had an adverse event: 5 (6.8%) had urethral/perineal pain and urethral bleeding and 2 (2.7%) required SPC.

None of the 100 patients undergoing urethral catheterisation using the Urethrotech UCD™ reported any complications.

Conclusions

Urethral catheterisation has a significant risk of trauma, particularly in elderly men with larger prostates. The Urethrotech UCD™ reduces the risk of difficult urethral catheterisation, particularly in high-risk patients, such as fully heparinised cardiac-surgery patients, and should be available when catheterisation is being performed by junior medical or nursing staff.
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