Total radiation burden in patients presenting with acute ureteric colic in the modern era
BAUS ePoster online library. Sihra N. 06/25/19; 259474; P11-1
Ms. Neha Sihra
Ms. Neha Sihra
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Abstract
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INTRODUCTION

Non-contrast CT KUB (NCCT) has become the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic, though the undisputed advantages need to be weighed against radiation risk. We aim to determine the total radiation burden associated with a single acute ureteric colic episode at our tertiary institution in the era of NCCT.

Patients and Methods

We reviewed the records of 51 consecutive patients with NCCT-confirmed acute ureteric colic.
Each episode was defined from the time of presentation to either the time of imaging-confirmed stone passage (SP), or last intervention (I) required for stone clearance. Total radiation doses were calculated for each episode.

RESULTS

SP occurred in 52% patients with a median episode duration of 72 days. Mean stone size was 6.8 mm (range 2-28). All patients had at least one NCCT. 34% had 2 and 4% had 3 scans.
The average total effective dose received during an acute episode was 10.60 mSv (range 1.94-45.78 mSv; 8.80 mSv (SP) vs 12.53 mSv (I)). For patients requiring intervention, 33% received a total effective dose between 10-20 mSv, and 19% received > 20 mSv.
The relative contribution of NCCT encompassed 87.9% of total effective radiation (95.5% (SP) vs 79.5%(I)). For patients requiring intervention, the average procedure-related total effective dose was 1.76 mSv.

Conclusions

Total radiation exposure for an acute ureteric colic episode at our institution is approximately 10mSv. Most of it is NCCT-related. This is useful benchmark for the development of future practice to reduce radiation and for comparison with other institutions.
INTRODUCTION

Non-contrast CT KUB (NCCT) has become the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic, though the undisputed advantages need to be weighed against radiation risk. We aim to determine the total radiation burden associated with a single acute ureteric colic episode at our tertiary institution in the era of NCCT.

Patients and Methods

We reviewed the records of 51 consecutive patients with NCCT-confirmed acute ureteric colic.
Each episode was defined from the time of presentation to either the time of imaging-confirmed stone passage (SP), or last intervention (I) required for stone clearance. Total radiation doses were calculated for each episode.

RESULTS

SP occurred in 52% patients with a median episode duration of 72 days. Mean stone size was 6.8 mm (range 2-28). All patients had at least one NCCT. 34% had 2 and 4% had 3 scans.
The average total effective dose received during an acute episode was 10.60 mSv (range 1.94-45.78 mSv; 8.80 mSv (SP) vs 12.53 mSv (I)). For patients requiring intervention, 33% received a total effective dose between 10-20 mSv, and 19% received > 20 mSv.
The relative contribution of NCCT encompassed 87.9% of total effective radiation (95.5% (SP) vs 79.5%(I)). For patients requiring intervention, the average procedure-related total effective dose was 1.76 mSv.

Conclusions

Total radiation exposure for an acute ureteric colic episode at our institution is approximately 10mSv. Most of it is NCCT-related. This is useful benchmark for the development of future practice to reduce radiation and for comparison with other institutions.
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