Comparison of complications after transrectal and transperineal prostate biopsy: a national population-based study
BAUS ePoster online library. Berry B. 11/10/20; 304106; P9-8
Mr. Brendan Berry
Mr. Brendan Berry
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Comparison of complications after transrectal and transperineal prostate biopsy: a national population-based study

Berry B1,2, Parry M1,2, Sujenthiran A1, Nossiter J1, Cowling T2, Aggarwal, Ajay A4, Cathcart P5, Payne H6, Clarke N3, van der Meulen J1,2
1Clinical Effectiveness Unit, Royal College of Surgeons of England, London, United Kingdom, 2Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom, 3The Christie and Salford Royal Hospitals Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom, 4Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Population, and Global Health, King's College London, United Kingdom, 5Department of Urology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, 6Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Prostate biopsies are increasingly being performed via the transperineal route. Our objective was to assess the complications of transrectal compared to transperineal prostate biopsies.

Patients and Methods:
All men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1st April 2014 and 2017 in England were identified. Administrative hospital data were used to identify biopsy route. Administrative hospital data were used to identify overnight hospital stay immediately after biopsy as well as hospital admissions because of sepsis, urinary retention or haematuria, mortality, and total length of hospital stay within the first 30 days. Generalised linear regression models were performed to calculate adjusted risk differences (aRD).

Results:
73,630 men were identified. Men who had a transperineal biopsy (n=13,723) were more likely to have an overnight stay than those who had a transrectal biopsy (n=59,907); (12.25% vs 2.36%; aRD 9.70%: 95% CI 7.12% to 12.27%), less likely to be readmitted because of sepsis (1.03% vs 1.35%; aRD -0.36%: -0.56% to -0.15%), and more likely to be readmitted for urinary retention (1.93% vs 0.95%; aRD 1.06%: 0.71% to 1.41%). There were no significant differences for risk of haematuria or mortality.

Conclusions:
Transperineal biopsies have a lower risk of sepsis but higher risk for urinary retention. Biopsies via the transperineal route would prevent one readmission for sepsis in 278 men at the cost of three additional men readmitted for urinary retention. These results reflect complications during a period when practice is moving towards performing more transperineal biopsies under local anaesthetic with fewer, more targeted needle insertions.
Comparison of complications after transrectal and transperineal prostate biopsy: a national population-based study

Berry B1,2, Parry M1,2, Sujenthiran A1, Nossiter J1, Cowling T2, Aggarwal, Ajay A4, Cathcart P5, Payne H6, Clarke N3, van der Meulen J1,2
1Clinical Effectiveness Unit, Royal College of Surgeons of England, London, United Kingdom, 2Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom, 3The Christie and Salford Royal Hospitals Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom, 4Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Population, and Global Health, King's College London, United Kingdom, 5Department of Urology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, 6Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Prostate biopsies are increasingly being performed via the transperineal route. Our objective was to assess the complications of transrectal compared to transperineal prostate biopsies.

Patients and Methods:
All men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1st April 2014 and 2017 in England were identified. Administrative hospital data were used to identify biopsy route. Administrative hospital data were used to identify overnight hospital stay immediately after biopsy as well as hospital admissions because of sepsis, urinary retention or haematuria, mortality, and total length of hospital stay within the first 30 days. Generalised linear regression models were performed to calculate adjusted risk differences (aRD).

Results:
73,630 men were identified. Men who had a transperineal biopsy (n=13,723) were more likely to have an overnight stay than those who had a transrectal biopsy (n=59,907); (12.25% vs 2.36%; aRD 9.70%: 95% CI 7.12% to 12.27%), less likely to be readmitted because of sepsis (1.03% vs 1.35%; aRD -0.36%: -0.56% to -0.15%), and more likely to be readmitted for urinary retention (1.93% vs 0.95%; aRD 1.06%: 0.71% to 1.41%). There were no significant differences for risk of haematuria or mortality.

Conclusions:
Transperineal biopsies have a lower risk of sepsis but higher risk for urinary retention. Biopsies via the transperineal route would prevent one readmission for sepsis in 278 men at the cost of three additional men readmitted for urinary retention. These results reflect complications during a period when practice is moving towards performing more transperineal biopsies under local anaesthetic with fewer, more targeted needle insertions.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies