Dogs - Urology's best friend
BAUS ePoster online library. Sarmah P. 11/10/20; 304122; P7-4
Mr. Piyush Sarmah
Mr. Piyush Sarmah
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Dogs - Urology's best friend

Sarmah P1, Donati-Bourne J2
1Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom, 2Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Dogs have played an important role in experimental urology, including developing surgical techniques and understanding renal pathophysiology. This study aimed to explore contributions dogs have made to the field of Urology.

Methods:
A comprehensive literature review relating to dogs and urology was performed. PubMed, MEDLINE®, and Google™ Scholar were searched for relevant scientific articles published to date in English. Manual bibliography search and 'related article' functions were employed to supplement the original search.

Results:
Urological surgery on dogs dates back to the 17th Century when von Roonhuysen (1672) and Zambeccarius (1678) performed unilateral nephrectomies, subsequently revealing compensatory hypertrophy of the remaining kidney. Comhaire in 1803 showed increased urea levels after nephrectomy in 65 dogs. The first successful nephrectomy was performed by Simon in 1869, but only following attempts on 30 dogs. Hinman experimented with unilateral ureteric ligation in dogs in 1926, removing the ligature at variable intervals of time to evaluate kidney viability after complete obstruction. Yarger (1974) unilaterally ligated canine ureters and showed a shift in the renal blood flow from the cortex to the juxtaglomerular regions. Dogs were instrumental in transplant surgery – vascular anastomosis in dogs was demonstrated by Carrel in 1902; he then performed renal transplants in them with ureteric anastomoses. Dogs have also been demonstrated to be able to distinguish bladder cancer urine from normal urine by odour, more successfully than would be expected by chance alone.

Conclusions:
Dogs have helped urologists in experimental urology and remain many urologists' best friend today.
Dogs - Urology's best friend

Sarmah P1, Donati-Bourne J2
1Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom, 2Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Dogs have played an important role in experimental urology, including developing surgical techniques and understanding renal pathophysiology. This study aimed to explore contributions dogs have made to the field of Urology.

Methods:
A comprehensive literature review relating to dogs and urology was performed. PubMed, MEDLINE®, and Google™ Scholar were searched for relevant scientific articles published to date in English. Manual bibliography search and 'related article' functions were employed to supplement the original search.

Results:
Urological surgery on dogs dates back to the 17th Century when von Roonhuysen (1672) and Zambeccarius (1678) performed unilateral nephrectomies, subsequently revealing compensatory hypertrophy of the remaining kidney. Comhaire in 1803 showed increased urea levels after nephrectomy in 65 dogs. The first successful nephrectomy was performed by Simon in 1869, but only following attempts on 30 dogs. Hinman experimented with unilateral ureteric ligation in dogs in 1926, removing the ligature at variable intervals of time to evaluate kidney viability after complete obstruction. Yarger (1974) unilaterally ligated canine ureters and showed a shift in the renal blood flow from the cortex to the juxtaglomerular regions. Dogs were instrumental in transplant surgery – vascular anastomosis in dogs was demonstrated by Carrel in 1902; he then performed renal transplants in them with ureteric anastomoses. Dogs have also been demonstrated to be able to distinguish bladder cancer urine from normal urine by odour, more successfully than would be expected by chance alone.

Conclusions:
Dogs have helped urologists in experimental urology and remain many urologists' best friend today.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies