Why one should STOP-Bang (in the urology clinic)?
BAUS ePoster online library. Tadtayev S. 11/10/20; 304135; P8-4
Mr. Sergey Tadtayev
Mr. Sergey Tadtayev
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Why one should STOP-Bang (in the urology clinic)?

Santiapillai J1, Tadtayev S1, Arumainayagam N1, Murray P1, Yeong K1
1Ashford and St Peters Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is recognised as one of the causes of nocturia, but its prevalence among patients with nocturia is unknown. Recently, the STOP-Bang questionnaire has emerged as a tool for risk-stratification of patients at the risk of OSA. We decided to offer patients presenting to the urology clinic with a bothersome nocturia a routine assessment with the STOP-Bang and a sleep study for those scoring > 3 or 3 with the evidence of cardiovascular disease. We retrospectively reviewed clinical outcomes in 71 consecutive patients managed in multi-disciplinary setting. The average age was 73 years (range 34-88) and median nocturia frequency 4. Patients at risk of undiagnosed OSA (35) were referred for sleep studies. Median STOP-Bang score of the referred patients was 5 and those not referred was 3. Overall, 88.6% of sleep studies demonstrated the presence of OSA; of these 74.2% confirmed moderate or severe disease. Nine patients (39%) with moderate or severe OSA denied snoring and the same number denied hypersomnolence; these patients were only diagnosed because of STOP-Bang assessment. In the whole cohort, 18 patients underwent bladder outlet procedures and 19 were prescribed desmopressin. Overall, median nocturia frequency in our patients decreased from 4 to 1. At least a third of patients (32%) with bothersome nocturia have an undiagnosed clinically significant OSA. Identification and treatment of OSA improve outcomes across the whole cohort because nocturia in patients without OSA is more likely to respond to standard therapies.
Why one should STOP-Bang (in the urology clinic)?

Santiapillai J1, Tadtayev S1, Arumainayagam N1, Murray P1, Yeong K1
1Ashford and St Peters Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is recognised as one of the causes of nocturia, but its prevalence among patients with nocturia is unknown. Recently, the STOP-Bang questionnaire has emerged as a tool for risk-stratification of patients at the risk of OSA. We decided to offer patients presenting to the urology clinic with a bothersome nocturia a routine assessment with the STOP-Bang and a sleep study for those scoring > 3 or 3 with the evidence of cardiovascular disease. We retrospectively reviewed clinical outcomes in 71 consecutive patients managed in multi-disciplinary setting. The average age was 73 years (range 34-88) and median nocturia frequency 4. Patients at risk of undiagnosed OSA (35) were referred for sleep studies. Median STOP-Bang score of the referred patients was 5 and those not referred was 3. Overall, 88.6% of sleep studies demonstrated the presence of OSA; of these 74.2% confirmed moderate or severe disease. Nine patients (39%) with moderate or severe OSA denied snoring and the same number denied hypersomnolence; these patients were only diagnosed because of STOP-Bang assessment. In the whole cohort, 18 patients underwent bladder outlet procedures and 19 were prescribed desmopressin. Overall, median nocturia frequency in our patients decreased from 4 to 1. At least a third of patients (32%) with bothersome nocturia have an undiagnosed clinically significant OSA. Identification and treatment of OSA improve outcomes across the whole cohort because nocturia in patients without OSA is more likely to respond to standard therapies.
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