Exercise-induced attenuation of treatment side-effects in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients beginning androgen deprivation therapy: a randomised controlled trial
BAUS ePoster online library. Ndjavera W. 11/10/20; 304138; P10-8
Mr. Wilphard Ndjavera
Mr. Wilphard Ndjavera
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Exercise-induced attenuation of treatment side-effects in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients beginning androgen deprivation therapy: a randomised controlled trial

Ndjavera W1, Orange S2, O'Doherty A2, Leicht A3, Rochester M1, Mills R1, Saxton J2,4
1Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital, United Kingdom, 2Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle, United Kingdom, 3Sport and Exercise Science, College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia, 4Norwich Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich Research Park, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

Objectives: (i) To assess whether exercise attenuates the adverse effects of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer patients, and (ii) to examine whether exercise-induced improvements are sustained after the withdrawal of supervised exercise.

Patients and Methods:
50 patients with prostate cancer scheduled for ADT were randomised to an exercise group (n = 24) or a control group (n = 26). The exercise group completed 3 months of supervised aerobic and resistance exercise training (twice a week for 60 min), followed by 3 months of self-directed exercise. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-months. The primary outcome was difference in fat mass at 3-months. Secondary outcomes included: fat-free mass, cardiopulmonary exercise testing variables, QRISK2 score, anthropometry, blood-borne biomarkers, fatigue, and quality of life (QoL).

Results:
At 3-months, exercise training prevented adverse changes in peak O2 uptake (1.9 mL/kg/min, P = 0.038), ventilatory threshold (1.7 mL/kg/min, P = 0.013), O2 uptake efficiency slope (0.21, P = 0.005), and fatigue (between-group difference in Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue score of 4.5 points, P = 0.024) compared with controls. After the supervised exercise was withdrawn, the differences in cardiopulmonary fitness and fatigue were not sustained, but the exercise group showed significantly better QoL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate difference of 8.5 points, P = 0.034) and a reduced QRISK2 score (2.9%, P = 0.041) compared to controls.

Conclusion:
A short-term programme of supervised exercise in patients with prostate cancer beginning ADT results in sustained improvements in QoL and cardiovascular events risk profile.

Exercise-induced attenuation of treatment side-effects in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients beginning androgen deprivation therapy: a randomised controlled trial

Ndjavera W1, Orange S2, O'Doherty A2, Leicht A3, Rochester M1, Mills R1, Saxton J2,4
1Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital, United Kingdom, 2Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle, United Kingdom, 3Sport and Exercise Science, College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia, 4Norwich Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich Research Park, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

Objectives: (i) To assess whether exercise attenuates the adverse effects of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer patients, and (ii) to examine whether exercise-induced improvements are sustained after the withdrawal of supervised exercise.

Patients and Methods:
50 patients with prostate cancer scheduled for ADT were randomised to an exercise group (n = 24) or a control group (n = 26). The exercise group completed 3 months of supervised aerobic and resistance exercise training (twice a week for 60 min), followed by 3 months of self-directed exercise. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-months. The primary outcome was difference in fat mass at 3-months. Secondary outcomes included: fat-free mass, cardiopulmonary exercise testing variables, QRISK2 score, anthropometry, blood-borne biomarkers, fatigue, and quality of life (QoL).

Results:
At 3-months, exercise training prevented adverse changes in peak O2 uptake (1.9 mL/kg/min, P = 0.038), ventilatory threshold (1.7 mL/kg/min, P = 0.013), O2 uptake efficiency slope (0.21, P = 0.005), and fatigue (between-group difference in Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue score of 4.5 points, P = 0.024) compared with controls. After the supervised exercise was withdrawn, the differences in cardiopulmonary fitness and fatigue were not sustained, but the exercise group showed significantly better QoL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate difference of 8.5 points, P = 0.034) and a reduced QRISK2 score (2.9%, P = 0.041) compared to controls.

Conclusion:
A short-term programme of supervised exercise in patients with prostate cancer beginning ADT results in sustained improvements in QoL and cardiovascular events risk profile.

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