Exploring patients' experience and perception of being diagnosed with bladder cancer: a mixed methods approach
BAUS ePoster online library. Tan W. 11/10/20; 304150; P12-4
Dr. Wei Shen Tan
Dr. Wei Shen Tan
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Exploring patients' experience and perception of being diagnosed with bladder cancer: a mixed methods approach

DTan W1, Teo C2, Chan D2, Ang K3, Heinrich M1, Feber A1, Sarpong R1, Williams N1, Brew-Graves C1, Ng C2, Kelly J1
1University College London, UK, 2University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 3Royal Free Hospital, London, UK

Background:
We determined patient experience and perception following a diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) using a mixed methods approach.

Methods:
Patients were part of a prospective multi-centre observational study recruiting patients with NMIBC for a biomarker study (DETECT II; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02781428). A mix methods approach comprising 1) the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (Brief IPQ) and 2) semi-structured interviews to explore patients' experience of haematuria, initial and subsequent experience with NMIBC diagnosis.

Results:
213 patients completed the Brief IPQ. Patients felt that they had minimal symptoms (median [IQR]: 2[0-5]) and were not particularly affected emotionally (3[1-6]) with a minimal effect to their life (2[0-5]). They remained concerned about their cancer diagnosis (5[3-8]) and felt little personal control over the cancer (2[2-5]) and believed that their illness would continue (6[3-10]). A significant association with a lower personal control of disease (p<0.05) and a poorer understanding of cancer management (p<0.05) was observed in patients >70 years. Qualitative analysis report that at initial haematuria presentation, most patients were unaware of the risk of NMIBC. Patients were most anxious and psychologically affected between the interval of cystoscopy diagnosis and transurethral resection (TUR). Following TUR, most patients were positive about their cancer prognosis.

Conclusion:
NMIBC patients, particularly elderly patients, have a poor perception of disease control and believe that their disease will continue over a prolonged period of time. Psychological support and prompt TUR following bladder cancer diagnosis would help improve the mental health of patients with NMIBC.
Exploring patients' experience and perception of being diagnosed with bladder cancer: a mixed methods approach

DTan W1, Teo C2, Chan D2, Ang K3, Heinrich M1, Feber A1, Sarpong R1, Williams N1, Brew-Graves C1, Ng C2, Kelly J1
1University College London, UK, 2University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 3Royal Free Hospital, London, UK

Background:
We determined patient experience and perception following a diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) using a mixed methods approach.

Methods:
Patients were part of a prospective multi-centre observational study recruiting patients with NMIBC for a biomarker study (DETECT II; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02781428). A mix methods approach comprising 1) the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (Brief IPQ) and 2) semi-structured interviews to explore patients' experience of haematuria, initial and subsequent experience with NMIBC diagnosis.

Results:
213 patients completed the Brief IPQ. Patients felt that they had minimal symptoms (median [IQR]: 2[0-5]) and were not particularly affected emotionally (3[1-6]) with a minimal effect to their life (2[0-5]). They remained concerned about their cancer diagnosis (5[3-8]) and felt little personal control over the cancer (2[2-5]) and believed that their illness would continue (6[3-10]). A significant association with a lower personal control of disease (p<0.05) and a poorer understanding of cancer management (p<0.05) was observed in patients >70 years. Qualitative analysis report that at initial haematuria presentation, most patients were unaware of the risk of NMIBC. Patients were most anxious and psychologically affected between the interval of cystoscopy diagnosis and transurethral resection (TUR). Following TUR, most patients were positive about their cancer prognosis.

Conclusion:
NMIBC patients, particularly elderly patients, have a poor perception of disease control and believe that their disease will continue over a prolonged period of time. Psychological support and prompt TUR following bladder cancer diagnosis would help improve the mental health of patients with NMIBC.
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