The self-lithotomy of Jan de Doot - Blacksmith, heal thyself
BAUS ePoster online library. Beebe J. 11/10/20; 304152; P7-6 Disclosure(s): None
Jacob Beebe
Jacob Beebe
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The self-lithotomy of Jan de Doot - Blacksmith, heal thyself

Beebe J1, Wharton I2
1University of Warwick Medical School, Coventry, United Kingdom, 2University Hospitals of Coventry & Warwickshire, United Kingdom

Nicolaes Tulp (1593-1674), master surgeon, mayor of Amsterdam, and subject of the Rembrandt masterpiece 'The Anatomy Lesson of Dr.Nicolaes Tulp' (1632) published the book 'Observationes Medicae'. Written in Latin for fellow physicians, it described medical curiosities that he encountered. In the chapter 'Aeger Sibi Calculum praecidens'(sick man cutting a stone from himself), he described the case of Blacksmith, Jan de Doot (1621-1665). Having survived two failed perineal lithotomy procedures for bladder lithiasis(combined mortality risk 64%) he lost faith in lithotomists and, due to intolerable ongoing pain, took matters into his own hands (1651). With his wife unwittingly dispatched to the fish market, he enrolled his brother's help. Using a self-crafted knife, he adopted the 'apparatus minor' approach. In lithotomy position, his brother lifted his scrotum. A finger was placed in his rectum and the bladder stone pulled towards his perineum. Doot then cut onto the stone. With the perineal incision too small, Doot tore it wider. With vigorous abdominal pressure, he eventually delivered the stone, which was chicken egg-sized and weighed 4-ounces. A barber surgeon was then summoned to approximate the wound. Despite festering, he survived. Fame followed and Doot released a poem alluding that despite both his action and name (doot = dead), he was still alive. Four years later Carel de Savoyen immortalised Doot in paint holding his stone and knife (1655). The portrait still hangs in the University of Leiden Department of Pathology. As Tulp summarised in his narrative, 'interdum quos ratio non restituit, adjuvat temeritas'–'sometimes daring helps where reason does not'.
The self-lithotomy of Jan de Doot - Blacksmith, heal thyself

Beebe J1, Wharton I2
1University of Warwick Medical School, Coventry, United Kingdom, 2University Hospitals of Coventry & Warwickshire, United Kingdom

Nicolaes Tulp (1593-1674), master surgeon, mayor of Amsterdam, and subject of the Rembrandt masterpiece 'The Anatomy Lesson of Dr.Nicolaes Tulp' (1632) published the book 'Observationes Medicae'. Written in Latin for fellow physicians, it described medical curiosities that he encountered. In the chapter 'Aeger Sibi Calculum praecidens'(sick man cutting a stone from himself), he described the case of Blacksmith, Jan de Doot (1621-1665). Having survived two failed perineal lithotomy procedures for bladder lithiasis(combined mortality risk 64%) he lost faith in lithotomists and, due to intolerable ongoing pain, took matters into his own hands (1651). With his wife unwittingly dispatched to the fish market, he enrolled his brother's help. Using a self-crafted knife, he adopted the 'apparatus minor' approach. In lithotomy position, his brother lifted his scrotum. A finger was placed in his rectum and the bladder stone pulled towards his perineum. Doot then cut onto the stone. With the perineal incision too small, Doot tore it wider. With vigorous abdominal pressure, he eventually delivered the stone, which was chicken egg-sized and weighed 4-ounces. A barber surgeon was then summoned to approximate the wound. Despite festering, he survived. Fame followed and Doot released a poem alluding that despite both his action and name (doot = dead), he was still alive. Four years later Carel de Savoyen immortalised Doot in paint holding his stone and knife (1655). The portrait still hangs in the University of Leiden Department of Pathology. As Tulp summarised in his narrative, 'interdum quos ratio non restituit, adjuvat temeritas'–'sometimes daring helps where reason does not'.
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