Ethnic variations in prostate cancer (PCa): The characteristics of prostate cancer in men of South Asian (SA) origin compared with Caucasian men in the United Kingdom.
BAUS ePoster online library. Srirangam S. 11/10/20; 304170; P9-2
Mr. Shalom Srirangam
Mr. Shalom Srirangam
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Ethnic variations in prostate cancer (PCa): The characteristics of prostate cancer in men of South Asian (SA) origin compared with Caucasian men in the United Kingdom.

Srirangam S1, Taylor C1, Otete H1
1East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Introduction:
There are racial variations within PCa, which appears less common in South Asian (Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi/Sri-Lankan) men in the UK. We scrutinised PCa characteristics in SA and Caucasian patients.

Patients and Methods:
A retrospective review identified 113 SA and 2872 Caucasian men with PCa between 2009-2019.

Results:
Median follow up was 54 months (2-240). SA patients were diagnosed at a lower age (p=0.0001) and with a lower initial PSA (p=0.003) (Table) compared to their Caucasian counterparts. There is a tendency towards lower grade/stage disease in SA men, but no statistically significant difference in Gleason scores, T-staging nor N-staging, however, Caucasian patients were two times more likely to present with metastatic disease. Communication problems were frequently encountered in SA patients with 43% relying on family members/interpreter. SA patients were more likely to be managed conservatively (27% vs 18%); more likely to undergo radical radiotherapy (37 vs 25%) rather than surgery (14 vs 20%); and less likely to receive hormonal manipulation compared to Caucasian counterparts (19 vs 31%). Within the SA group, 81% demonstrated no evidence of disease progression and 8(7%) patients died due to PCa.

Conclusion:
This provides interesting insights into PCa characteristics in SA men in the UK, with a tendency towards earlier diagnosis and lower risk disease and challenges involving communication. The role of ethnicity in PCa is complex and poorly understood, but national PCa guidance many not be universally applicable to SA patients and focused, prospective, multi-modality research, involving primary care, is necessary to understand PCa management in SA men.
Ethnic variations in prostate cancer (PCa): The characteristics of prostate cancer in men of South Asian (SA) origin compared with Caucasian men in the United Kingdom.

Srirangam S1, Taylor C1, Otete H1
1East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Introduction:
There are racial variations within PCa, which appears less common in South Asian (Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi/Sri-Lankan) men in the UK. We scrutinised PCa characteristics in SA and Caucasian patients.

Patients and Methods:
A retrospective review identified 113 SA and 2872 Caucasian men with PCa between 2009-2019.

Results:
Median follow up was 54 months (2-240). SA patients were diagnosed at a lower age (p=0.0001) and with a lower initial PSA (p=0.003) (Table) compared to their Caucasian counterparts. There is a tendency towards lower grade/stage disease in SA men, but no statistically significant difference in Gleason scores, T-staging nor N-staging, however, Caucasian patients were two times more likely to present with metastatic disease. Communication problems were frequently encountered in SA patients with 43% relying on family members/interpreter. SA patients were more likely to be managed conservatively (27% vs 18%); more likely to undergo radical radiotherapy (37 vs 25%) rather than surgery (14 vs 20%); and less likely to receive hormonal manipulation compared to Caucasian counterparts (19 vs 31%). Within the SA group, 81% demonstrated no evidence of disease progression and 8(7%) patients died due to PCa.

Conclusion:
This provides interesting insights into PCa characteristics in SA men in the UK, with a tendency towards earlier diagnosis and lower risk disease and challenges involving communication. The role of ethnicity in PCa is complex and poorly understood, but national PCa guidance many not be universally applicable to SA patients and focused, prospective, multi-modality research, involving primary care, is necessary to understand PCa management in SA men.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies