All Saints' Hospital: 100 years on, lost but not forgotten
BAUS ePoster online library. Bedi N. 11/10/20; 304180; P7-9
Mr. Nishant Bedi
Mr. Nishant Bedi
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All Saints' Hospital: 100 years on, lost but not forgotten

Bedi N1
1Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Introduction:
In 1920, 100 years ago, All Saints' Hospital for Genito-Urinary Disease began to treat inpatients and became the largest Specialist Urological hospital in the UK.

Methods:
A non-systematic search of electronic journals and online archives regarding specialist Urological Hospitals.

Results:
At its height, All Saints' Urology Hospital had over 50 inpatient beds and was treating 600 inpatients and 1500 outpatients a year. With no National Health Service, many hospitals in that era were founded and funded by wealthy philanthropists. Edward Canny Ryall was the founder and he funded the hospital himself for many years. The first patient to attend the hospital was so unwashed that Ryall gave him a shilling to go for a bath. The patient later repaid the shilling, which was displayed in the front hall. Ryall's overarching principle was to avoid open operations, given the high mortality risk and instead use less invasive techniques. He worked with Terrence Millin to pioneer TURP in the UK, with All Saints' the first hospital to offer this procedure. TURP patients remained in hospital for three weeks, while those having open prostatectomy at St Peter's were in for thirteen weeks.

Conclusion:
With the creation of the NHS, All Saints' became one of the units of the Westminster Hospital and was renamed the Westminster Hospital Urological Centre. As the first hospital to offer TURP in the UK, 100 years on its legacy of minimally invasive surgery lives on today.
All Saints' Hospital: 100 years on, lost but not forgotten

Bedi N1
1Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Introduction:
In 1920, 100 years ago, All Saints' Hospital for Genito-Urinary Disease began to treat inpatients and became the largest Specialist Urological hospital in the UK.

Methods:
A non-systematic search of electronic journals and online archives regarding specialist Urological Hospitals.

Results:
At its height, All Saints' Urology Hospital had over 50 inpatient beds and was treating 600 inpatients and 1500 outpatients a year. With no National Health Service, many hospitals in that era were founded and funded by wealthy philanthropists. Edward Canny Ryall was the founder and he funded the hospital himself for many years. The first patient to attend the hospital was so unwashed that Ryall gave him a shilling to go for a bath. The patient later repaid the shilling, which was displayed in the front hall. Ryall's overarching principle was to avoid open operations, given the high mortality risk and instead use less invasive techniques. He worked with Terrence Millin to pioneer TURP in the UK, with All Saints' the first hospital to offer this procedure. TURP patients remained in hospital for three weeks, while those having open prostatectomy at St Peter's were in for thirteen weeks.

Conclusion:
With the creation of the NHS, All Saints' became one of the units of the Westminster Hospital and was renamed the Westminster Hospital Urological Centre. As the first hospital to offer TURP in the UK, 100 years on its legacy of minimally invasive surgery lives on today.
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