Establishing a national cadaveric emergency urology course to increase trainee preparedness for independent on-call practice in the United Kingdom
BAUS ePoster online library. Bullock N. 11/10/20; 304183; P11-6
Mr. Nicholas Bullock
Mr. Nicholas Bullock
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Abstract
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Establishing a national cadaveric emergency urology course to increase trainee preparedness for independent on-call practice in the United Kingdom

Bullock N1, Cashman S2, Armitage J2, Biers S2, Featherstone J1, Hughes O1
1Department of Urology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom, 2Department of Urology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Level 4 competence across a range of emergency cases is required for certification in urology in the UK. Given many of these conditions are uncommon, exposure during training may be limited. This prospective study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a standardised cadaveric emergency urology simulation course aimed at addressing this current training deficit.
Materials and Methods: 104 delegates undertook one of seven two-day BAUS supported emergency urology cadaveric courses held at two pilot centres, comprising hands-on operating using fresh frozen cadavers and case based discussions. Delegates were invited to complete pre- and post-course questionnaires relating to operative experience and confidence in performing specific emergency procedures independently. Primary outcome was a self-reported 'confidence score' for each procedure covered.

Results:
Response rates for pre- and post-course surveys were 81.7% and 64.4% respectively, with 58.7% completing both. Respondents ranged from FY2 to Locum Consultant, with the greatest proportion being ST5-7 Speciality Trainees (36.5%). Respondents reported no pre-course experience in packing of a transurethral resection cavity and emergency nephrectomy (median 0 cases), and very limited experience in the surgical management of ureteric injuries (median of 1 case for both end-to-end anastomotic repair and reimplantation). ISCP competency level was not documented for the majority of evaluated procedures. Following course completion, a statistically significant increase in confidence score was observed for each index procedure (p<0.001 for all comparisons).

Conclusions:
A standardised cadaveric simulation course can improve exposure to and trainee confidence in performing a wide range of emergency procedures in the GMC Urology curriculum.
Establishing a national cadaveric emergency urology course to increase trainee preparedness for independent on-call practice in the United Kingdom

Bullock N1, Cashman S2, Armitage J2, Biers S2, Featherstone J1, Hughes O1
1Department of Urology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom, 2Department of Urology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Level 4 competence across a range of emergency cases is required for certification in urology in the UK. Given many of these conditions are uncommon, exposure during training may be limited. This prospective study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a standardised cadaveric emergency urology simulation course aimed at addressing this current training deficit.
Materials and Methods: 104 delegates undertook one of seven two-day BAUS supported emergency urology cadaveric courses held at two pilot centres, comprising hands-on operating using fresh frozen cadavers and case based discussions. Delegates were invited to complete pre- and post-course questionnaires relating to operative experience and confidence in performing specific emergency procedures independently. Primary outcome was a self-reported 'confidence score' for each procedure covered.

Results:
Response rates for pre- and post-course surveys were 81.7% and 64.4% respectively, with 58.7% completing both. Respondents ranged from FY2 to Locum Consultant, with the greatest proportion being ST5-7 Speciality Trainees (36.5%). Respondents reported no pre-course experience in packing of a transurethral resection cavity and emergency nephrectomy (median 0 cases), and very limited experience in the surgical management of ureteric injuries (median of 1 case for both end-to-end anastomotic repair and reimplantation). ISCP competency level was not documented for the majority of evaluated procedures. Following course completion, a statistically significant increase in confidence score was observed for each index procedure (p<0.001 for all comparisons).

Conclusions:
A standardised cadaveric simulation course can improve exposure to and trainee confidence in performing a wide range of emergency procedures in the GMC Urology curriculum.
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