John Elderton - The man behind the lithotrite?
BAUS ePoster online library. Warner R. 11/10/20; 304196; P7-7
Mr. Ross Warner
Mr. Ross Warner
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
John Elderton - The man behind the lithotrite?

Warner R1, O'Dell F1, Miller M1
1Northampton General Hospital, United Kingdom

Introduction:
The journey in the treatment of bladder stones from lithotomy to lithotrity has been well documented. There is little doubt that the operative technique was advanced and popularised by French surgeons in the early 19th century, for example, Jean Civiale performing his first lithotrity procedure in 1824. However, identification of the original designs and inventions is less clear. We look at the life and work of John Elderton a British surgeon credited with designing a curved lithotrite in 1817.
Materials and Methods: A literature search relating to lithotrity and review of hospital archive information regarding John Elderton.

Results:
John Elderton (1791 – 1844) was a House Surgeon at Northampton General Infirmary. He was a keen teacher and designed a number of anatomical casts, instruments and pathological specimens alongside a colleague William Money. These included devices to help reduce shoulder dislocations and compound fractures and were on display up until the Second World War. In 1817 he sent plans for a curved instrument for crushing bladder stones to Sir Benjamin Brodie (Sergeant-surgeon to the Queen) to whom he had been a student, and published them in 1819. It remains unclear whether the instrument was actually developed or used.

Conclusions:
John Elderton was highly thought of with regards to his designs of medical devices and teaching equipment. As part of a broad spectrum of work, he was undoubtedly involved in the early designs of the Lithotrite.
John Elderton - The man behind the lithotrite?

Warner R1, O'Dell F1, Miller M1
1Northampton General Hospital, United Kingdom

Introduction:
The journey in the treatment of bladder stones from lithotomy to lithotrity has been well documented. There is little doubt that the operative technique was advanced and popularised by French surgeons in the early 19th century, for example, Jean Civiale performing his first lithotrity procedure in 1824. However, identification of the original designs and inventions is less clear. We look at the life and work of John Elderton a British surgeon credited with designing a curved lithotrite in 1817.
Materials and Methods: A literature search relating to lithotrity and review of hospital archive information regarding John Elderton.

Results:
John Elderton (1791 – 1844) was a House Surgeon at Northampton General Infirmary. He was a keen teacher and designed a number of anatomical casts, instruments and pathological specimens alongside a colleague William Money. These included devices to help reduce shoulder dislocations and compound fractures and were on display up until the Second World War. In 1817 he sent plans for a curved instrument for crushing bladder stones to Sir Benjamin Brodie (Sergeant-surgeon to the Queen) to whom he had been a student, and published them in 1819. It remains unclear whether the instrument was actually developed or used.

Conclusions:
John Elderton was highly thought of with regards to his designs of medical devices and teaching equipment. As part of a broad spectrum of work, he was undoubtedly involved in the early designs of the Lithotrite.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies