Trends in antibiotic resistance for escherichia coli positive urinary infections over six years
BAUS ePoster online library. Ong A. 11/11/20; 304201; P13-8
Dr. Andrea Ong
Dr. Andrea Ong
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Trends in antibiotic resistance for escherichia coli positive urinary infections over six years

Ong A1, Mahobia N1, Browning D1, Schembri M1, Somani B1
1Southampton General Hospital, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health problem. Our aim was to review the resistance of Escherichia coli to antibiotics at our university hospital over a six-year period and see whether our protocol based antibiotic policy over this time led to any change in the resistance patterns.

Patients and Methods:
Sensitivities of E.coli urine isolates between 2014-2019 (6-years), sourced from the hospital and general practitioners in the community, were collected from the microbiology department. Previous trends of resistance for Cefalexin, Ciprofloxacin, Co-amoxiclav, Gentamicin, Nitrofurantoin, Trimethoprim, Amikacin, and Pivmecillinam were examined using the Cochran-Armitage test.

Results:
712,004 urine samples tested positive for E.coli (Table 1). The overall resistance trends for Cefalexin, Nitrofurantoin and Amikacin remained equivocal; increased for Co-amoxiclav, Ciprofloxacin and Gentamicin; and reduced for Trimethoprim and Pivmecillinam.

Conclusion:
Despite our protocol based antibiotic policy, although the overall antibiotic resistance remained stable, there was an increasing trend in antibiotic resistance for more commonly used antibiotics including Co-amoxiclav, Ciprofloxacin and Gentamicin, reflecting their overall use for prophylaxis and treatment. We plan to continue our policy of reviewing our antibiotic usage and the prescribing protocol with the microbiology department to minimize antimicrobial resistance.
Trends in antibiotic resistance for escherichia coli positive urinary infections over six years

Ong A1, Mahobia N1, Browning D1, Schembri M1, Somani B1
1Southampton General Hospital, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health problem. Our aim was to review the resistance of Escherichia coli to antibiotics at our university hospital over a six-year period and see whether our protocol based antibiotic policy over this time led to any change in the resistance patterns.

Patients and Methods:
Sensitivities of E.coli urine isolates between 2014-2019 (6-years), sourced from the hospital and general practitioners in the community, were collected from the microbiology department. Previous trends of resistance for Cefalexin, Ciprofloxacin, Co-amoxiclav, Gentamicin, Nitrofurantoin, Trimethoprim, Amikacin, and Pivmecillinam were examined using the Cochran-Armitage test.

Results:
712,004 urine samples tested positive for E.coli (Table 1). The overall resistance trends for Cefalexin, Nitrofurantoin and Amikacin remained equivocal; increased for Co-amoxiclav, Ciprofloxacin and Gentamicin; and reduced for Trimethoprim and Pivmecillinam.

Conclusion:
Despite our protocol based antibiotic policy, although the overall antibiotic resistance remained stable, there was an increasing trend in antibiotic resistance for more commonly used antibiotics including Co-amoxiclav, Ciprofloxacin and Gentamicin, reflecting their overall use for prophylaxis and treatment. We plan to continue our policy of reviewing our antibiotic usage and the prescribing protocol with the microbiology department to minimize antimicrobial resistance.
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