3D printing improved testicular prosthesis prototypes: using lattice infill structure to modify mechanical properties
BAUS ePoster online library. Chen M. 11/11/20; 304207; P13-7
Michael Chen
Michael Chen
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3D printing improved testicular prosthesis prototypes: using lattice infill structure to modify mechanical properties

Skewes J1, Chen M1,2, Forrestal D1, Rukin N1,2, Woodruff M1
1Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, 2Redcliffe Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

Introduction:
Silicone and liquid filled testicular implants have problems with firmness, shape, size and positioning and risks of rupture. We aimed to develop a 3D printed testicular prosthesis with an anatomical size and shape which matches the stiffness characteristics of a human testicle without liquid or silicone infills.
Materials and Methods: A total of 27 testicular prostheses and uniform test samples with differing characteristics using a cubic lattice unit cell were 3D printed. These prostheses were compression tested and property matched to human testicular stiffness values from literature. Additionally, the 3D printed testicular prosthesis and 3 market testicular prostheses (Promedon, Torosa and Kiwee) were hardness tested and compared. Young's Modulus or stiffness, and shore hardness measurements. Sample sizes of 3 were used to evaluate the repeatability of the results and the printing process.

Results:
3D printed testicular prostheses using a cubic lattice structure of relative densities between 0.3 and 0.4 and a material with an elastic modulus of 3-4 GPa can match the stiffness characteristics of human testicles. Hardness testing results showed that current market testicular prosthesis are 2 – 4 times harder than the 3D printed testicular prosthesis.

Conclusions:
3D printing can be used to match the properties of human tissue to create customisable, patient specific testicular prostheses with no risk of rupture. This method could be applied to a variety of other implants mimicking native tissues.
3D printing improved testicular prosthesis prototypes: using lattice infill structure to modify mechanical properties

Skewes J1, Chen M1,2, Forrestal D1, Rukin N1,2, Woodruff M1
1Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, 2Redcliffe Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

Introduction:
Silicone and liquid filled testicular implants have problems with firmness, shape, size and positioning and risks of rupture. We aimed to develop a 3D printed testicular prosthesis with an anatomical size and shape which matches the stiffness characteristics of a human testicle without liquid or silicone infills.
Materials and Methods: A total of 27 testicular prostheses and uniform test samples with differing characteristics using a cubic lattice unit cell were 3D printed. These prostheses were compression tested and property matched to human testicular stiffness values from literature. Additionally, the 3D printed testicular prosthesis and 3 market testicular prostheses (Promedon, Torosa and Kiwee) were hardness tested and compared. Young's Modulus or stiffness, and shore hardness measurements. Sample sizes of 3 were used to evaluate the repeatability of the results and the printing process.

Results:
3D printed testicular prostheses using a cubic lattice structure of relative densities between 0.3 and 0.4 and a material with an elastic modulus of 3-4 GPa can match the stiffness characteristics of human testicles. Hardness testing results showed that current market testicular prosthesis are 2 – 4 times harder than the 3D printed testicular prosthesis.

Conclusions:
3D printing can be used to match the properties of human tissue to create customisable, patient specific testicular prostheses with no risk of rupture. This method could be applied to a variety of other implants mimicking native tissues.
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