Investigating the effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments (SMA) for prostate cancer survivors after robotic surgical treatment
BAUS ePoster online library. Tien T. 11/10/20; 304224; P11-8 Disclosure(s): N/A
Mr. Tony Tien
Mr. Tony Tien
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Investigating the effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments (SMA) for prostate cancer survivors after robotic surgical treatment

Tien T1, Allchorne P1,2, Briggs K2, Hazell E2, Fleure L2, Green J1
1Whipps Cross University Hospital, London, United Kingdom, 2Guys and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Shared medical appointments (SMA) in some cancer survivors have shown to be effective with high satisfaction rates. Robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) for localised prostate cancer can lead to embarrassing side effects including erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. We aimed to assess whether SMAs were appropriate in managing post-RALP side effects.
Materials and Methods: A prospective study was performed at a tertiary hospital in London (United Kingdom). After a new prostate cancer survivorship pathway was implemented, patients were referred to a post-RALP SMA. Questionnaire results were analysed to assess overall acceptability. Subgroup analysis on age and ethnicity was performed to identify variations of acceptability.

Results:
A total of 223 patients completed post SMA questionnaires. 222 patients (95.6%) were satisfied with the post-RALP SMA and 215 (96.4%) felt comfortable speaking in the group setting. 218 (97.8%) were confident in managing the side effects after the SMA. Age subgroup analysis showed no statistical significance. In the ethnicity subgroup analysis, more Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) patients felt the seminar provided too much information (13.6% vs 1.6%, p<0.01) and preferred individual appointments (17.3% vs 5.5%, p<0.01). Furthermore, 12.3% BAME vs 0% Caucasian patients (p<0.001) would prefer three separate appointments for the same information.

Conclusions:
Patients are comfortable asking questions and had high satisfaction rates with post-RALP SMA. Some BAME patients felt too much information was provided, and a few would prefer individual appointments and separate consultations. Providing patient choice between post-RALP SMA or individual appointments would ensure maximal benefit and support.
Investigating the effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments (SMA) for prostate cancer survivors after robotic surgical treatment

Tien T1, Allchorne P1,2, Briggs K2, Hazell E2, Fleure L2, Green J1
1Whipps Cross University Hospital, London, United Kingdom, 2Guys and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Shared medical appointments (SMA) in some cancer survivors have shown to be effective with high satisfaction rates. Robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) for localised prostate cancer can lead to embarrassing side effects including erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. We aimed to assess whether SMAs were appropriate in managing post-RALP side effects.
Materials and Methods: A prospective study was performed at a tertiary hospital in London (United Kingdom). After a new prostate cancer survivorship pathway was implemented, patients were referred to a post-RALP SMA. Questionnaire results were analysed to assess overall acceptability. Subgroup analysis on age and ethnicity was performed to identify variations of acceptability.

Results:
A total of 223 patients completed post SMA questionnaires. 222 patients (95.6%) were satisfied with the post-RALP SMA and 215 (96.4%) felt comfortable speaking in the group setting. 218 (97.8%) were confident in managing the side effects after the SMA. Age subgroup analysis showed no statistical significance. In the ethnicity subgroup analysis, more Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) patients felt the seminar provided too much information (13.6% vs 1.6%, p<0.01) and preferred individual appointments (17.3% vs 5.5%, p<0.01). Furthermore, 12.3% BAME vs 0% Caucasian patients (p<0.001) would prefer three separate appointments for the same information.

Conclusions:
Patients are comfortable asking questions and had high satisfaction rates with post-RALP SMA. Some BAME patients felt too much information was provided, and a few would prefer individual appointments and separate consultations. Providing patient choice between post-RALP SMA or individual appointments would ensure maximal benefit and support.
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