National implementation of an evidence-based, stakeholder-driven national Quality Improvement Programme: an update
BAUS ePoster online library. To W. 11/10/20; 304225; P11-11
Mr. Wilson To
Mr. Wilson To
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
National implementation of an evidence-based, stakeholder-driven national Quality Improvement Programme: an update

To W1,2, Balayah Z1, Keohane A1, Khadjesari Z3, Savdalis N1, Green J1,2
1King's College London, London, United Kingdom, 2Whipps Cross Hospital, Barts Health London NHS Trust, United Kingdom, 3University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

Background:
A well-designed Quality Improvement (QI) programme is essential in an effective healthcare system. However, QI implementation remains fragmented within UK surgical specialties. In 2016 we developed the 'Education in Quality Improvement Programme' (EQUIP) for Urology training programme. Here we demonstrate how to achieve national implementation of EQUIP using a stakeholder-driven Theory-of-Change (ToC) methodology.

Methods:
The ToC received multidisciplinary stakeholder input (i.e. Urology staff, patients, managers, educators, charity funders, national curriculum and society leads, and improvement science experts); Development Phase: national needs assessment and reviews of QI education in surgery informed draft ToC; Review Phase: draft ToC was reviewed in a multidisciplinary workshop (N=10) and semi-structured interviews with stakeholders (N=6); Refinement Phase: ToC was refined further in final workshop (N=10) and senior stakeholder interviews (N=4). All data were recorded and analysed using the Framework Method.

Results:
There is a lack of robust QI training and standard of delivery in the current Urological curriculum. There is a need to develop an evidence-based, user-informed QI training capacity with multi-disciplinary cooperation and committed leadership. We identified the detailed inputs, activities and enablers needed to achieve this (figure 1). The British Association of Urological Surgeons was identified as the key specialty organisation that could drive the national implementation of EQUIP e.g. establishing QI platform and regional QI champions (figure 1).

Conclusion:
Using standardised ToC methodology, we developed a clear evidence-based strategy, driven by key stakeholders, to implement a nationally scalable QI programme. This can achieve educational impact and positive system change in Urology services.
National implementation of an evidence-based, stakeholder-driven national Quality Improvement Programme: an update

To W1,2, Balayah Z1, Keohane A1, Khadjesari Z3, Savdalis N1, Green J1,2
1King's College London, London, United Kingdom, 2Whipps Cross Hospital, Barts Health London NHS Trust, United Kingdom, 3University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

Background:
A well-designed Quality Improvement (QI) programme is essential in an effective healthcare system. However, QI implementation remains fragmented within UK surgical specialties. In 2016 we developed the 'Education in Quality Improvement Programme' (EQUIP) for Urology training programme. Here we demonstrate how to achieve national implementation of EQUIP using a stakeholder-driven Theory-of-Change (ToC) methodology.

Methods:
The ToC received multidisciplinary stakeholder input (i.e. Urology staff, patients, managers, educators, charity funders, national curriculum and society leads, and improvement science experts); Development Phase: national needs assessment and reviews of QI education in surgery informed draft ToC; Review Phase: draft ToC was reviewed in a multidisciplinary workshop (N=10) and semi-structured interviews with stakeholders (N=6); Refinement Phase: ToC was refined further in final workshop (N=10) and senior stakeholder interviews (N=4). All data were recorded and analysed using the Framework Method.

Results:
There is a lack of robust QI training and standard of delivery in the current Urological curriculum. There is a need to develop an evidence-based, user-informed QI training capacity with multi-disciplinary cooperation and committed leadership. We identified the detailed inputs, activities and enablers needed to achieve this (figure 1). The British Association of Urological Surgeons was identified as the key specialty organisation that could drive the national implementation of EQUIP e.g. establishing QI platform and regional QI champions (figure 1).

Conclusion:
Using standardised ToC methodology, we developed a clear evidence-based strategy, driven by key stakeholders, to implement a nationally scalable QI programme. This can achieve educational impact and positive system change in Urology services.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies