Patient satisfaction in bladder cancer: a data linkage study from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES)
BAUS ePoster online library. Ince J. 11/10/20; 304240; P12-3 Disclosure(s): Supported with grant funding from the Action Bladder Cancer UK Improving Outcomes for Patients Programme 2017.
Jonathan Ince
Jonathan Ince
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Patient satisfaction in bladder cancer: a data linkage study from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES)

Ince J2, Shah S2, Kockelbergh R1,2
1University Hospitals of Leicester, United Kingdom, 2University of Leicester, United Kingdom

Analysis of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey has until now lacked detailed analysis of patients with bladder cancer.
The National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service provided anonymised individual patient data from patients with bladder cancer from the 2015 NCPES linked by NHS number to the national radiotherapy and chemotherapy databases and Hospital Episode Statistics. NCPES contains 99 questions therefore these were grouped into themes including quality of life, activities of daily living, symptoms, psychological impact and body image. 673 patients with bladder cancer submitted a response to NCPES. 75% were male, 63% were under 75 years, only 9.8% were current smokers although 51% were ex-smokers. 62% had a long-term health condition (LHC), 22% performed a caring role and 20% had a stoma. 92% of patients had transitional cell carcinoma, 67% were grade 3. 16% were treated with systemic chemotherapy and 6% had intravesical chemotherapy. 16% were treated with cystectomy and 12% with radiotherapy, predominantly with curative intent. The following statistical differences were found: Worse quality of life in smokers, carers and those with LHC. There was a greater impact on activities of daily living among older patients, carers and those with LHC. Men, older patients and those with LHC had worse symptoms. Smokers and those with long term health conditions experienced the greatest psychological impact. Body image was worse in those with LHC. There are major quality of life impacts in bladder cancer patients but these vary depending on the quality of life metric and patient characteristics.
Patient satisfaction in bladder cancer: a data linkage study from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES)

Ince J2, Shah S2, Kockelbergh R1,2
1University Hospitals of Leicester, United Kingdom, 2University of Leicester, United Kingdom

Analysis of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey has until now lacked detailed analysis of patients with bladder cancer.
The National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service provided anonymised individual patient data from patients with bladder cancer from the 2015 NCPES linked by NHS number to the national radiotherapy and chemotherapy databases and Hospital Episode Statistics. NCPES contains 99 questions therefore these were grouped into themes including quality of life, activities of daily living, symptoms, psychological impact and body image. 673 patients with bladder cancer submitted a response to NCPES. 75% were male, 63% were under 75 years, only 9.8% were current smokers although 51% were ex-smokers. 62% had a long-term health condition (LHC), 22% performed a caring role and 20% had a stoma. 92% of patients had transitional cell carcinoma, 67% were grade 3. 16% were treated with systemic chemotherapy and 6% had intravesical chemotherapy. 16% were treated with cystectomy and 12% with radiotherapy, predominantly with curative intent. The following statistical differences were found: Worse quality of life in smokers, carers and those with LHC. There was a greater impact on activities of daily living among older patients, carers and those with LHC. Men, older patients and those with LHC had worse symptoms. Smokers and those with long term health conditions experienced the greatest psychological impact. Body image was worse in those with LHC. There are major quality of life impacts in bladder cancer patients but these vary depending on the quality of life metric and patient characteristics.
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