Natural 'Stone breakers'
BAUS ePoster online library. Reekhaye A. 11/10/20; 304261; P7-2
Mr. Abhishek Reekhaye
Mr. Abhishek Reekhaye
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Natural 'Stone breakers'

Reekhaye A1, Sriprasad S2
1Queen Elizabeth Hospital Woolwich, London, United Kingdom, 2Darent Valley Hospital, Dartford, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Urinary stones and attempts to clear the stones by herbs have existed since antiquity. In the ancient world, this was influenced by the classical view of the high priests. This paper investigates this fascinating history.

Methods:
A search for sources was undertaken using Internet and library sources.

Results:
Several herbs were found to cure urinary stones. Chanca Piedra translates to ''Stone breaker'' in Spanish and is indigenous to the rain forests of Amazon, India and Africa. The plant Phyllanthus niruri consistently has demonstrated litholytic properties and has been part of many civilizations including Indian medicine (Ayurveda). Known as bhumyamalaki in Sanskrit, this is perhaps the only herb that has undergone in-vitro, animal, and clinical trials that support its role on calcium oxalate crystallization. Ammi Visnaga (Khella. Queen's lace) is a flowering plant from the carrot family. The herb appeared in the Egyptian Ebers Papyrus 4000 years ago as an effective agent in treating stones. The seeds contain Khellin, which has been used to treat renal colic. The common bearberry (Urva-ursi) a pretty plant grown in in higher altitudes of western world is attributed to 'break stones' in many folklores. Avicenna the famous Persian philosopher (Circa 1025) reported 65 beneficial herbal medicines for destructing, expelling, and preventing kidney stones in his book the Canon of Medicine, which include black pepper, pennyroyal, and cinnamon.

Conclusion:
Herbal remedies have existed for a long time and may have a role in prevention of stones. Some of them at least may warrant scientific research.
Natural 'Stone breakers'

Reekhaye A1, Sriprasad S2
1Queen Elizabeth Hospital Woolwich, London, United Kingdom, 2Darent Valley Hospital, Dartford, United Kingdom

Introduction:
Urinary stones and attempts to clear the stones by herbs have existed since antiquity. In the ancient world, this was influenced by the classical view of the high priests. This paper investigates this fascinating history.

Methods:
A search for sources was undertaken using Internet and library sources.

Results:
Several herbs were found to cure urinary stones. Chanca Piedra translates to ''Stone breaker'' in Spanish and is indigenous to the rain forests of Amazon, India and Africa. The plant Phyllanthus niruri consistently has demonstrated litholytic properties and has been part of many civilizations including Indian medicine (Ayurveda). Known as bhumyamalaki in Sanskrit, this is perhaps the only herb that has undergone in-vitro, animal, and clinical trials that support its role on calcium oxalate crystallization. Ammi Visnaga (Khella. Queen's lace) is a flowering plant from the carrot family. The herb appeared in the Egyptian Ebers Papyrus 4000 years ago as an effective agent in treating stones. The seeds contain Khellin, which has been used to treat renal colic. The common bearberry (Urva-ursi) a pretty plant grown in in higher altitudes of western world is attributed to 'break stones' in many folklores. Avicenna the famous Persian philosopher (Circa 1025) reported 65 beneficial herbal medicines for destructing, expelling, and preventing kidney stones in his book the Canon of Medicine, which include black pepper, pennyroyal, and cinnamon.

Conclusion:
Herbal remedies have existed for a long time and may have a role in prevention of stones. Some of them at least may warrant scientific research.
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